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November 23 2012

waka
18:32
neko miku cleaning luka neko :3
Reposted bydonotmindmeSarielTangueronaruul4desu-mizu

November 18 2012

waka
11:16
Matchmaking Maneki Neko - via A Japan Photo per Day -

Imado Shrine, Asakusa, Tokyo

From the many exotic Japanese customs, one that I always enjoy is Maneki Neko, the beckoning cat. So when I learned that the Imado Jinja from Asakusa, Tokyo, is one of the two places related to the beginning of the Maneki Neko legend, I went there to visit and research.

Maneki Neko is one of the most popular lucky charms from Japan and these statues, representing a calico Japanese bobtail with a raised paw, can be found in almost every shop or restaurant, because it is believed that they bring prosperity by inviting the customers inside.

However, the Maneki Neko from the Imado Jinja are very special… Here, the cats are always represented in pairs, a male and a female. The reason is that Imado Jinja enshrines the couple of Shinto gods Izanagi-no-Mikoto and Izanami-no-Mikoto, so it is also known as a shrine from matchmaking. This attribute was applied to the Maneki Neko here, and now the paired statues are considered to bring, besides good luck in business, good luck in love and marriage.

Reposted byWeks Weks

November 01 2012

waka
00:47
miku nyan neko
Tags: miku nyan neko

October 31 2012

waka
09:34
nyaa miku neko <3
Tags: nyaa miku neko <3

September 26 2012

waka
10:03
meiko sega miku neko

July 28 2012

waka
08:46
Kimono Maneki Neko -  via A Japan Photo per Day -

Maneki neko

Everywhere in Japan, in hotels, stores or restaurants, you will encounter the lovely cat beckoning with the paw, Maneki Neko… One of the most popular Japanese charms for good luck and prosperity, Maneki Neko comes from a very old Japanese tradition (the beginnings of the legend are taught at the Gotokuji Temple in Tokyo and another version can be found in Asakusa, at the Imado Shrine)…

There are now hundreds of Maneki Neko styles, but traveling through Japan, from time to time, you can still find a less common version - I found this unusual one, dressed in kimono, displayed on the Omote-sando street from Narita.

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